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Coronavirus (COVID-19)

In an effort to improve response times, NHS 111 is recommending that patients concerned about COVID-19 should use the online assessment tool in the first instance.

https://111.nhs.uk/covid-19

https://www.leicestercityccg.nhs.uk/my-health/coronavirus-advice/coronavirus-information-in-different-languages-and-formats/

 

There are also some videos by local clinicians in a variety of languages to provide advice and guidance to patients. To date the videos have been filmed in Hindi, Gujarati, Punjabi, Urdu, Polish, Romanian and Telugu with versions in other languages to follow shortly.

You can access the YouTube videos by visiting:

https://www.leicestercityccg.nhs.uk/my-health/coronavirus-advice/coronavirus-information-in-different-languages-and-formats/.

To keep up to date with the latest information please go to: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/leicester-lockdown-what-you-can-and-cannot-do

If you have symptoms of coronavirus or you’ve been in close contact with someone who has had symptoms, please get tested as soon as you can.

The main symptoms of coronavirus are:

  • high temperature
  • continuous new cough
  • loss of smell
  • loss of taste.

Book your test online at nhs.uk/ask-for-a-coronavirus-test or call 119.

All of the drive-through centres will accept people who walk in – but you should still book an appointment first.

When you go for your test, wear a face covering and bring a photo ID as well as your booking number.

If you test positive for coronavirus, you must stay at home for at least 7 days and until you feel better. People in your household should stay at home for 14 days.

What to do if you need medical help

If you need medical help for any reason, do not go to places like a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital.

If you have symptoms of coronavirus (a high temperature or a new, continuous cough, loss of smell or taste), use the 111 coronavirus service. https://111.nhs.uk/covid-19/

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Call 999

If you are in immediate danger, call 999 and ask for the police - the police will continue to respond to emergency calls.

If you are in danger and unable to talk on the phone, call 999 and then press 55. This will transfer your call to the relevant police force who will assist you without you having to speak.

Flu

The flu virus typically peaks during the winter months, the best way to help protect yourself and others from catching and spreading flu is to have the flu jab every year.

 

Flu strains can change from year to year, which means last year’s jab may not protect you from this year’s strains. The vaccine usually provides protection for the duration of that year's flu season.

 

Getting vaccinated is important each year but this year more than ever people are urged to have the vaccine in order to protect themselves, and the NHS, this winter.

 

Children aged 2 and 3 years old, plus all primary school aged children and school year 7 in secondary school, will be offered the nasal spray vaccination. The adult flu vaccine is offered free to those in groups at particular risk of infection and complications from flu (for more details see the list at the end of this page).

 

The groups being offered the adult flu vaccine are:

  • Pregnant women
  • Those aged 65 or over
  • Those aged under 65 with long-term conditions (see list below)
  • Carers
  • Shielded patients and those in the same household aged 18 or over
  • Pending supply, 50 - 64 year olds will be invited no earlier than November

 

Due to the pandemic, flu vaccination clinics may be held in a slightly different way this year.

 

Flu vaccines will be released in batches, according to both availability and also the need to prioritise those most at risk. This means flu clinics will be staggered in the months ahead.

 

For those who are eligible, GP surgeries across Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are gearing up to provide special clinics to offer patients their annual flu jab.

 

GPs are asking their patients to book a place in forthcoming flu clinics as soon as they are advertised. If you are housebound, please speak to your GP practice.

 

Those who do not fall within the eligible categories for a free NHS vaccination will be able to buy a flu vaccine from their local participating pharmacy.

 

This year eligibility for the flu vaccination has been extended to those aged 50 to 64 years. Please note that people in the 50 to 64 year old age group will not be vaccinated until November and December, providing there is sufficient vaccine, and no appointments will be offered for this age group until then. This is to ensure that those who are most at risk are vaccinated first. If you are 50 to 64 and you are in one of the other groups which is eligible for the flu vaccination, for example you have a health condition which puts you at risk from flu, you will be invited earlier.

 

The flu vaccination offers an important health protection. Flu can lead to existing health conditions getting worse or the development of an illness such as bronchitis or pneumonia, or it could even be fatal. A vaccination helps protect the health of a pregnant mother and her child.

 

You can see the full list of those eligible for a flu vaccination below.

 

Most GP practices will begin inviting those patients most at risk for a flu vaccination from September onwards, and it is anticipated those newly eligible, aged 50 – 64 years, will be invited for vaccination during November or December.

 

Loughborough Road

22nd September - Over 65's only

6th October

Evington Medical Centre

23rd September

7th October

14th October

Saturday clinic

17th October

 

To help us to make sure we are reaching all groups in our local communities, we are asking patients to check that their GP practice has recorded their ethnicity status in their records.

Symptoms

Common symptoms of flu include a high temperature, fatigue, headache, general aches and pains and a dry, chesty cough. If you are generally fit and healthy you can usually manage the symptoms at home yourself without seeing a doctor. The best remedy is to rest at home, keep warm and drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration. Paracetamol or ibuprofen may help lower a high temperature and relieve aches. A pharmacist will be able to provide advice on medication.

 

People suffering with a cold or flu should avoid going into hospital, GP practice or other health setting to reduce the chance of vulnerable people catching the virus. The flu virus can be very dangerous for the elderly and the infirm particularly if they are already sick. This is a message that applies to people coming into hospital seeking treatment and to people coming to visit relatives.

 

Help to stop spreading colds and flu.

Colds and flu are caused by viruses and easily spread to other people. Germs from coughs and sneezes survive on hands and surfaces for up to 24 hours. You are infectious until all symptoms are gone which usually takes a week or two.

 

You can help prevent colds and flu spreading by using tissues to ‘catch it, kill it, bin it’. Washing your hands regularly with soap and water destroys bugs that you may have picked up from touching surfaces used by other people, such as light switches and door handles. It is also important to keep household items clean, including cleaning such items as cups, glasses and towels, especially if someone in your house is ill.

 

People with worsening symptoms or respiratory problems are advised not to visit a GP surgery or a hospital but to call their GP first or call NHS111 for further advice.

 

 

Who is eligible for a free NHS flu vaccine?

In 2020/21, flu vaccinations will be offered under the NHS flu vaccination programme to the following groups:

  • chronic (long-term) respiratory disease, such as severe asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or bronchitis
  • chronic heart disease, such as heart failure
  • chronic kidney disease at stage three, four or five
  • chronic liver disease
  • chronic neurological disease, such as Parkinson’s disease or motor neurone disease,
  • learning disability
  • diabetes
  • splenic dysfunction or asplenia
  • a weakened immune system due to disease (such as HIV/AIDS) or treatment (such as cancer treatment)
  • morbidly obese (defined as BMI of 40 and above)
  • all children aged two to eleven (but not twelve years or older) on 31 August 2020
  • people aged 65 years or over (including those becoming age 65 years by 31 March 2021)
  • those aged from six months to less than 65 years of age, in a clinical risk group such as those with:
  • all pregnant women (including those women who become pregnant during the flu season)
  • household contacts of those on the NHS Shielded Patient List, or of immunocompromised individuals, specifically individuals who expect to share living accommodation with a shielded patient on most days over the winter and therefore for whom continuing close contact is unavoidable
  • people living in long-stay residential care homes or other long-stay care facilities where rapid spread is likely to follow introduction of infection and cause high morbidity and mortality. This does not include, for instance, prisons, young offender institutions, university halls of residence, or boarding schools (except where children are of primary school age or secondary school Year 7).
  • those who are in receipt of a carer’s allowance, or who are the main carer of an older or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer falls ill
  • health and social care staff, employed by a registered residential care/nursing home or registered domiciliary care provider, who are directly involved in the care of vulnerable patients/clients who are at increased risk from exposure to influenza.
  • health and care staff, employed by a voluntary managed hospice provider, who are directly involved in the care of vulnerable patients/clients who are at increased risk from exposure to influenza.
  • health and social care workers employed through Direct Payments (personal budgets) and/or Personal Health Budgets, such as Personal Assistants, to deliver domiciliary care to patients and service users. 2. Additionally, in 2020/21, flu vaccinations might be offered under the NHS flu vaccination programme to the following groups:

individuals between 50-64 years, following prioritisation of other eligible groups and subject to vaccine supply

https://www.westleicestershireccg.nhs.uk/your-health-and-services/flu-safe

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Changes to Repeat prescription ordering

Ordering repeat prescriptions

What is changing?

The way repeat prescriptions are ordered is changing for patients of Evington Medical Centre. From 9th March 2020 you will have to order your repeat prescriptions directly through the surgery, and not your high street or internet pharmacy or appliance contractor.

What is not changing?

If you already order repeat prescriptions directly through your GP practice this change will not affect you.

When you order your repeat prescription directly through the surgery, your pharmacy will continue to collect or receive your prescription as before. Pharmacies may also continue to deliver your prescription if they offer this service.

Why is this change happening?

In Leicester City we are moving away from pharmacists ordering on behalf of patients, to ensure that excess medicines are not being ordered. This brings the city into line with the rest of Leicestershire and Rutland, where a similar change has previously been made.

For most people, being in charge of their own repeat prescriptions means that they only get the medicine they need at the time they need it. This can help prevent the build-up of unused or old medicines at home, which prevents waste and saves valuable NHS resources.

Estimates suggest that unused or partially used medication costs the NHS £300million each year, a figure which could pay for over 11,000 more community nurses or nearly 20,000 more drug treatment courses for breast cancer.

How do I order my prescription through my GP practice?

You can order repeat prescriptions through the surgery online, by post, or in person by using the tick slip, which is the right-hand side of your prescription which lists your current repeat medication.

The online route, through the NHS GP Online service, is quick and easy to set up and enables you to book GP appointments and view some of your medical records, as well as manage your prescriptions. You simply need to speak to staff at your GP practice, who will talk you through the process. Once set up to access GP services online, you can download the NHS app so you can order repeat prescriptions from your mobile phone.

Research carried out by NHS England indicates that 85% of people who use the service say that ordering prescriptions online is straightforward.

 

What are you doing to help patients who will find it difficult to order their own prescriptions?

We know that some patients may find it difficult to order prescriptions themselves and we are taking steps to identify these patients, so that they will still have the option to have their repeat prescriptions ordered for them. We are also encouraging any patients or carers to speak to us if they will find it difficult to order their prescriptions themselves. We do not want vulnerable patients to be disadvantaged by this change.

An “Exemption from Repeat Prescribing Changes” form is available for patients requesting help ordering their repeat medication. This form will be available at the GP practice and may also be available from your local pharmacy. Patients should complete the form and return it to their GP practice. Any exemptions will be subject to agreement by the GP practice.

Find out more on the Leicester City CCG website http://bit.ly/Leicester-Repeat-Meds 

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